Blog

Blog

We draw upon our extensive experience in water treatment to provide you with a wealth of knowledge and help you make wise, healthy decisions.

Mold or Mildew in Your Toilet Bowl and Bathtub? Here’s How to Get Rid of It

02 March, 2014
Published in Home Care







How to Get Rid of Mold and Mildew StainsMold or Mildew Buildup – Black, Orange or Green – What Is It?

Mold or mildew manifests in your toilet bowl as a black, orangey or green ring that also can spread as streaks down the inside of the bowl. Mold or mildew will also cause the black, orangey or green discoloration that may appear at the end of a showerhead, shower doors or curtains sink drains, bathtubs, tiles and grout. The appearance of this issue is associated with several factors having to do with moisture but is generally not a problem with water quality. Mold or mildew is common where there is moisture. Bathrooms are especially susceptible which include toilet bowls, showerheads, shower doors or curtains, sink drains, bathtubs, tiles and grout.

Most mold or mildew can appear when any water sits for a period of time in the open air. This is why this issue is very common. Well ventilated spaces can prevent mold and mildew and yet that well ventilated space can also carry airborne bacteria that can still result in mold, mildew or pink stains.

Mold or Mildew – How To Get Rid Of It

There are several things you can do to prevent the stains from developing.  Drying wet surfaces after use will prevent mold and mildew from growing.

For toilets, we have found over the years from manufacturers, our own personal experience and feedback from many customers that there is a way that takes less than a minute to make this “job” easy. Simply get a good toilet bowl cleaner (some may actually be specific for mold and mildew) and squirt around the bowl from the rim of the toilet and leave it. Upon your return, using a soft brush, apply light pressure against the bowl surface, swish the water around the bowl and flush. Do this before the reappearance of the discoloration and stay ahead of any reappearance. Routine maintenance is the key.

Remember to flush any guest or infrequently used toilets on a daily basis to avoid setting a stain.

Many toilet bowl cleaners are available in spray-on or leave-in formats that effectively clean mold and mildew rings from the toilet bowl with weekly to monthly cleanings. These cleaners dissolve the ring and are rinsed away the next time the toilet is flushed. Chlorine bleach can also remove the black stain left behind by a ring of mold.

For harder to remove stains you can use regular household bleach and a soft bristle cleaning brush to gently scrub the affected area.  An old toothbrush or nail brush works great.

Avoid being too aggressive with cleaning solutions or abrasive methods – please exercise caution. Others who recommend the use of stainless steel or wool pads or even pumice stones have given you information contrary to manufacturer warranties. These items will scratch and remove the protective coating, sealant or finish on the toilet which ironically makes them more susceptible to staining, mold or mildew, bacteria growth and mineral deposit rings. Chlorine tablets or any toilet tank cleaners are not recommended. Check with the toilet bowl manufacturer for more information and warranty.

Shower curtains and liners – wash them in hot water with a little bleach.  For patterned shower curtains, use color-safe bleach.

Bathtubs, sinks, drains, faucets, showerheads and other surfaces – if you can keep them wiped down and dry, the formation of mold and mildew may be avoided. Use similar cleaning methods as you would to clean the toilet. Do not be aggressive and if you have any special finishes consult with the manufacturer.

Natural surfaces (granite, marble, travertine, etc.), tile and grout can be porous and require a proper sealant and yet aggressive or incorrect cleaning will remove sealant over time. A good and properly applied sealant on marble, travertine, granite and other surfaces, tile and grout will prevent or inhibit any issues. Water should bead up or wipe up easy and not soak in. Resealing should be done as needed or on a schedule based on the material or surface to be sealed depending on manufacturer recommendations and your local conditions and usage.

Again, as with other items, if you can keep surfaces wiped down and dry, the formation of mold and mildew may be avoided. Use similar cleaning methods on mold and mildew as you would to clean the toilet. Do not be aggressive and if you have any special finishes consult with the manufacturer.

Pink Stains in Your Toilet Bowl and Bathtub? Here’s How to Get Rid of It

28 February, 2014
Published in Home Care







How to Get Rid of Pink StainsPink Stains – What Is It?

Pink residue is generally not a problem with water quality. A pink discoloration may be a result of iron found in some well water or old pipes in the delivery system but would not be isolated to only one toilet, one fixture or one room. In most cases a pink residue is likely a result of airborne bacteria which produce a pinkish or dark gray film on moist surfaces. This film is usually found as a ring that accumulates at the water line in the toilet bowl or around showerheads, shower doors or curtains, sink drains, bathtubs, tiles and grout.

Some people have also noted that the pink residue appears in their pet’s water bowl, which causes no apparent harm to the pet and is easily cleaned off.

Many experts agree that the bacteria that causes these pink stains is most likely Serratia Marcescens, a bacteria which is found naturally in soil, food, and in animals. Serratia, which produce a characteristic red pigment, thrive on moisture, dust, and phosphates and need almost nothing to survive. Serratia is easily carried airborne and will seek a moist location in which to grow. Some people have reported that the pink residue only appears during certain times of the year, when their windows or doors are left open for part of the day. Ironically good ventilation will not help. These bacteria are present in a number of environments and wind can carry the airborne bacteria or dust in which the bacteria are present. Serratia marcescens thrives in conditions that are wet and seek a constant introduction of fat or phosphorous-laden materials, such as feces, urine, soap, gels and shampoo products and/or food products.

Pink Stains – How To Get Rid Of It

Customers have asked us why there is a pink ring in their toilet bowl or evidence of the pink discoloration elsewhere and what can they do to get rid of it. Often they are concerned that something must be in the water which is not the case and nothing to fear. However, the pink ring that develops at the water line in the toilet, around drains, in the tub/shower area, in bathroom drinking cups, and even dog bowls is actually caused by airborne bacteria known as Serratia marcescens. The airborne bacteria thrive in moist environments, which is why it is commonly found in bathrooms.

Serratia marcescens survives when any water sits for a period of time in the open air. This is why this issue is very common.

There are several things you can do to prevent the pink stains from developing. Drying wet surfaces after use will prevent the bacteria from growing.

For toilets, we have found over the years from manufacturers, our own personal experience and feedback from many customers that there is a way that takes less than a minute to make this “job” easy. Simply get a good toilet bowl cleaner and squirt around the bowl from the rim of the toilet and leave it. Upon your return, using a soft brush, apply light pressure against the bowl surface, swish the water around the bowl and flush. Do this before the reappearance of the discoloration and stay ahead of any reappearance. Serratia Marcescens cannot be completely killed and removed, but routine maintenance can keep the bacteria from reappearing, increasing or becoming a more stubborn issue. Remember to flush any guest or infrequently used toilets on a daily basis to avoid setting a stain.

For harder to remove stains you can use regular household bleach and a soft bristle cleaning brush to gently scrub the affected area.  An old toothbrush or nail brush works great.

Avoid being too aggressive with cleaning solutions or abrasive methods – please exercise caution. Others who recommend the use of stainless steel or wool pads or even pumice stones have given you information contrary to manufacturer warranties. These items will scratch and remove the protective coating, sealant or finish on the toilet which ironically makes them more susceptible to staining, mold or mildew, bacteria growth and mineral deposit rings. Chlorine tablets or any toilet tank cleaners are not recommended. Check with the toilet bowl manufacturer for more information and warranty.

Shower curtains and liners – wash them in hot water with a little bleach.  For patterned shower curtains, use color-safe bleach.

Bathtubs, sinks, drains, faucets, showerheads and other surfaces – if you can keep them wiped down and dry, the formation of pink residue may be avoided. Use similar cleaning methods as you would to clean the toilet. Do not be aggressive and if you have any special finishes consult with the manufacturer.

Natural surfaces (granite, marble, travertine, etc.), tile and grout can be porous and require a proper sealant and yet aggressive or incorrect cleaning will remove sealant over time. A good and properly applied sealant on marble, travertine, granite and other surfaces, tile and grout will prevent or inhibit any issues. Water should bead up or wipe up easy and not soak in. Resealing should be done as needed or on a schedule based on the material or surface to be sealed depending on manufacturer recommendations and your local conditions and usage.

Again, as with other items, if you can keep surfaces wiped down and dry, the formation of pink residue may be avoided. Use similar cleaning methods as you would to clean the toilet. Do not be aggressive and if you have any special finishes consult with the manufacturer.

If you have staining, mold, mildew, or other buildup, click here to download our Information & Care Guide. For further help, please contact customer service and we will be happy to help you!

Ready for Download: Free EWS App for iPhone, iPad, and Android

10 January, 2013
Published in







We are excited to announce our new EWS app for iPhone, iPad, and all Android phones and tablets. The app was built to make it easy to access our product selector, catalog, videos, and customer service. The app turned out to be a beautiful and intuitive tool, and we hope you enjoy using it.

Download for Free

button_android_app

images

images-1

 

 

 

 

EWS APP Simulation

Tagged under